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cover image for Hockney

Hockney

Sospiro Noir - SOSHC100314
Distributed by Proper Note

HOCKNEY - in cinemas from November 28th 2014 - BBC broadcast Feb/March 2015

A soundtrack album of rare quality.
Inspired by the directness and hugely emotional content of David Hockney's art, John Harle's score to Hockney is equally direct and engaging. From a quirky, almost Jaques Tati-esque banjo theme to the exotica of Los Angeles and the jazz basements of '60's London, this album never fails to entertain and surprise.

After winning both Ivor Novello and Royal Television Society awards in 2013 for 'Best Musical Score' for his music for Lucian Freud - Painted Life, composer John Harle has followed up with a feature film release on the life of the iconic and captivating Yorkshire artist David Hockney, directed by Randall Wright.

Guitarist John Parricelli, pianist Steve Lodder and percussionist Hugh Wilkinson (all of whom featured in Harle's The Tyburn Tree project with Marc Almond) are fluid and inspired soloists, duetting alongside Harle's own trademark saxophone sound.

TRACK LIST

 1 HOCKNEY 2'39"

2  FRESH FLOWERS 1'41"

3  BEVERLEY HILLS EXOTICA 2'52"

4  COMING OUT 2'45"

5  HIS MOTHER WANTED A BOY 2'12"

6  VAUDEVILLE BOY 3'25"

7  SURF BOY 2'15"

8  CITY OF NIGHT 2'42"

9  BEDLAM BLONDE 1'51"

10  BRIDLINGTON PROMENADE 2'52"

11  BLUE RHAPSODY 1'44"

12  TIME IS NOT AN ILLUSION 2'57"

13  THE SPLASH (Angel Eyes) 2'45"

14  BLUE POOLS 1'53"

15  THE GRAND CANYON 1'30"

16  MOTHER'S DEATH 1'26"

17  TABAC BAR 0'55"

18  THE SCRABBLE GAME 0'55"

19  GAY LIFE 1'52"

20  THE BRADFORD BOMB 1'34"

21  SAUNTERING 2'08"

Total 45'03"

FILM PREVIEW
Sunday Times - Culture Section *****
HOCKNEY - A Blakeway and Fly Film production.

I loved the film -- I am not a wholehearted, come-what-may Hockney fan, except as a wonderful grumpy old man, but it really made me appreciate both his character and his talent, in a way I really didn't expect. I loved the circling structure, and in particular the music. Five stars from me!
Helen Hawkins - Sunday Times Culture editor

HOCKNEY - FEATURED MUSICIANS
JOHN HARLE
Soprano Saxophone, Clarinets, Fender Rhodes, Basses, Keyboards

JOHN  PARRICELLI
Electric Guitar, Sitar Guitar, Banjo, Acoustic Guitar

ALEXANDER BALANESCU
Violin

AIDAN SHEPPARD
Accordion

STEVE LODDER
Piano/Moog Synth (Track 12)

HUGH WILKINSON
Drums and Percussion

DANIEL EISNER HARLE
Drum Programming (Track 12)

All music composed, arranged, mixed
and produced by John Harle

THE MUSIC FOR HOCKNEY
Hockney has pints of awkwardness in his blood, ‘F**k you, I don’t care what the neighbours think’.
Joyously he defends his liberty: Smoking, painting, looking at the world his way...
John Harle has a similar intensity, brilliant, audacious, funny and distinctly English. And he smokes cigars.
They are both born to entertain, charm, and are both artistically omnivorous and authentic.

John instantly grasped that David’s more populist public stance is both genuine and a cover for a much more complex, serious, vulnerable and perhaps lonely person. There are always undercurrents in the great pictures, quite literally in A Bigger Splash, which is a witty painting of a body, but at the same time a sad story: the much loved swimmer will never surface in this world. Love is still out of reach. John’s track, The Splash (Angel Eyes) exposes the hidden romantic message perfectly.

John's genius reveals these deeper layers in all the pictures of the film. I wanted the music to be telling the story.
The album tells a similar story, starting and finishing with a wonderful carefree tone, with John Parricelli's banjo and the jokey coconuts, and becoming a delightful tea dance. It echoes Hockney’s personal motto to ‘love life’. John's virtuoso clarinet in Fresh Flowers goes further: the thrill of drawing, of getting out of yourself to see life with an innocent eye, as if for the first time. Vaudeville Boy offers the tantalizing fantasy of love and sex. Surf Boy, The Bradford Bomb and The Grand Canyon dive deeper into what John describes as the duende, meaning the soul or ‘irrationality, earthiness, a heightened awareness of death, and a dash of the diabolical.’ Gay Life adds a wonderful jazz improvisation by Steve Lodder.
This is film music that ignores the dreary overtones of the word documentary. The film's desire to portray the complexity of David’s optimism is unimaginable without it.
Hockney can draw and paint like an angel.
Harle’s music reveals a magician.
RANDALL WRIGHT

PRE-ORDER HERE FROM AMAZON